Tuesday, May 26, 2015



Word of God

Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth from the mouth of God
Matthew 4:4

The Gospel According to Luke 5:32


32 I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.

Brethren:

Herein we find the entirety of the Gospel of Christ in summation. The calling of all sinners to repentance. If you recall we spoke the other day of one of Satan’s greatest lies, that being one wherein he says we are not worthy to be called God’s children, yet today we’ve read how the Lord our Redeemer has refuted that lie by noting that all are sinners and are in need of salvation through Him. 

The Scribes and Pharisees were in their own apprehension, and in the esteem of others, who trusted in themselves, that they were righteous, and submitted not to the righteousness of Christ: these Christ came not to call by his grace, and therefore did not associate himself with them: but sinners to repentance; such as the publicans, and others, with them, were; and therefore he was chiefly with such, and chose to be among them: these he not only called to repentance by the outward ministry of the word, but brought them to it; he having power to bestow the grace of repentance, as well as to call to the duty of it. 

That these publicans and sinners were sick persons, and needed his company and assistance; but that they, the Scribes and Pharisees, were whole, and in good health, in their own esteem, and so wanted no relief; and therefore ought not to take it amiss, that he attended the one, and not the other. These words give a general view of mankind, in their different sentiments of themselves and of Christ; and of the usefulness of Christ to one sort, and not another. There are some that cry up the power of man's freewill, and plead for the strength and purity of human, nature, and extol its excellencies and abilities; and it is no wonder that these see no need of Christ, either for themselves or others. They depreciate his offices, reject his righteousness, and deny his satisfaction and atonement: and such reckon themselves the favourites of heaven, and are ready to say, whom shall God delight to honour, but us, who are so pure and holy? they therefore trust in their own righteousness, and despise others, and submit not to the righteousness of Christ; they make their own works their saviours, and so neglect the great salvation by Christ.

These persons; are not such who are made righteous, by the righteousness of Christ imputed to them, but such who were outwardly righteous before men, who trusted in themselves that they were righteous, depended on their own righteousness, and fancied themselves, with respect to the righteousness of the law, blameless; and so, in their own apprehensions, stood in no need of Christ and his righteousness: yea, even needed not repentance, according to their own thoughts of things, and therefore were not called to it, but were left to their own stupidity and blindness; these were the Scribes and Pharisees; . 

Then we find that;

There are the others that are sick, and are quite sick of themselves; they see the impurity of their nature, how unsound and unhealthful they are; that from the crown of the head to the sole of the foot, there is no soundness in them, nothing but wounds, bruises, and putrefying sores: their loins are filled with the loathsome disease of sin; they are sensible of their inability to cure themselves, and that no mere creature can help them; and that all besides Christ, are physicians of no value: and therefore they apply to him, whose blood is a balm for every wound, and a medicine for every sickness and disease, and which cleanses from all sin: and whereas such, and such only, see their need of Christ as a physician, these only does he attend under this character, and such who are made sensible of sin, and so of their need of Christ as a Saviour; and who have evangelical repentance given them, and are called to the exercise and profession of it: and Christ's calling sinners to repentance, and bestowing that grace, together with the remission of sins, which goes along with it, is doing his work and office as a "physician” (see Matthew 9:12)

Monday, May 25, 2015




Christ in the Heart
By Alexander Maclaren; Edited by Doktor Riktor Von Zhades

17 That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith: 18 That ye, being rooted and grounded in love, may be able to comprehend with all Saints, what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height: 19 And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye may be filled with all fullness of God
The Epistle to the Ephesians 3:17-19

Open the Door Through Which Christ Comes in to Dwell


Faith is here represented as the means or condition through which this dwelling takes effect. To have but to believe in Him and He comes, drawn from Heaven, and enters into the heart to abide here within us.

Trust in Him is faith, "I dwell in the high and holy place, with him also that is of a contrite and humble spirit." Rivers do not run on the mountain tops, but down in the valleys. So the heart that is lifted up and self-complacent has no dew of His blessing resting upon it, but has the curse of Gilboa adhering to its barrenness ; but the low lands, the humble and the lowly hearts, are they in which the waters that go softly, scoop their course, and diffuse their blessings. Faith therefore is trust in Him, and not in ourselves.

Never in the history of the world has it been or can it be that a longing towards Him shall be a longing thrown back unsatisfied upon itself. You have but to trust, and you possess. We open the door for the entrance of Christ by the simple act of faith, and blessed be His name ! He can squeeze Himself through a very little chink, and He does not require that the gates should be flung wide open in order that, with some of His blessings, He may come in.

Christianity of the false sort has much to say about the indwelling of God in the soul, but it spoils all its teaching by insisting upon it that the condition on which God dwells in the soul is the soul's purifying itself to receive Him. But you cannot cleanse your hearts so as to bring Christ into them, you must let Him come and cleanse them by the process of His coming, and fit them thereby for His own indwelling. And, assuredly, He will so come, purging us from our evil and abiding in our hearts.

But do not forget that the faith which brings Christ into the spirit must be a faith which works by love if it is to keep Christ in the spirit. You cannot bring that Lord into your hearts by anything that you do. The man that cleanses his own soul by his own strength, and so expects to draw God into it, has made the mistake which Christ pointed out when He told us that when the unclean spirit is gone out of a man he leaves his house empty, though it be swept and garnished. Moral reformation may turn out the devils, it will never bring in God. And in the emptiness of the swept and garnished heart there is an invitation to the seven to come back again and fill it.

And whilst that is true, remember, on the other hand, that a Christian man can drive away his Master by evil works. The sweet song-birds and the honey-making bees are said always to desert a neighborhood before a pestilence breaks out in it. And if I may so say, similar quick to feel the first breath of the pestilence is the presence of the Christ which cannot dwell with evil. You bring Christ into your heart by faith, without any work at all ; you keep Him there by a faith which produces holiness.


Sunday, May 24, 2015



Christ in the Heart (part one)
By Alexander Maclaren; Edited by Doktor Riktor Von Zhades

17 That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith: 18 That ye, being rooted and grounded in love, may be able to comprehend with all Saints, what is the breadth, and length, and depth, and height: 19 And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye may be filled with all fullness of God
The Epistle to the Ephesians 3:17-19

Consider the Indwelling of Christ, as desired by the Apostle for all Christians.

To begin with, let me say in the plainest, simplest, strongest way that I can, that that dwelling of Christ in the believing heart is to be regarded as being a plain literal fact.

To a man who does not believe in the Divinity of Jesus Christ, of course that is nonsense, but to those of us who do see in Him the manifested incarnate God, there ought to be no difficulty in accepting this as the simple literal force of the words before us, that in every soul where faith, howsoever feeble, has been exercised, there Jesus Christ does verily abide.

It is not to be weakened down into any notion of participation in His likeness, sympathy with His character, submission to His influence, following His example, listening to His instruction, or the like. A dead Plato may so influence his followers, but that is not how a living Christ influences His disciples. What is meant is no mere influence derived but separable from Him, however blessed and gracious that influence might be, but it is the presence of His own self, exercising influences which are inseparable from His presence, and only to be realized when He dwells in us.

I think that Christian people as a rule do far too little turn their attention to this aspect of the Gospel teaching, and concentrate their thoughts far too much upon that which is unspeakably precious in itself, but does not exhaust all that Christ is to us, viz., the work that He wrought for us upon Calvary; or to take a step further, the work that He is now carrying on for us as our Intercessor and Advocate in the Heavens. You who listen to me Sunday after Sunday will not suspect me of seeking to minimize either of these two aspects of our Lord's mission and operation, but I do believe that very largely the glad thought of an indwelling Christ Who actually abides and works in our hearts, and is not only for us in the Heavens, or with us by some kind of impalpable and metaphorical presence, but in simple, that is to say, in spiritual reality is in our spirits, has faded away from the consciousness of the Christian Church. I preach, and rejoice that I have to preach, a " Christ that died, yea! rather that is risen again; Who is even at the right hand of God, Who also maketh intercession for us." Nor do I stop there, but I preach a Christ that is in us, dwelling in our hearts if we be His at all.

Well, then, further observe that the special emphasis of the prayer here is that this " indwelling" may be an unbroken and permanent one. Any of you who can consult the original for yourselves will see that the Apostle here uses a compound word which conveys the idea of intensity and continuity. What he desires, then, is not merely that these Ephesian Christians may have occasional visits of the indwelling Lord, or that at some lofty moments of spiritual enthusiasm they may be conscious that He is with them, but that always, in an unbroken line of deep, calm receptiveness, they may possess, and know that they possess, an indwelling Saviour. For we, each one of us, are capable of the continuous abiding of that Lord within us.

We all seek and pray that our hearts are strengthened by the Spirit is fitted to be the Temple of the indwelling Christ. How shall we prepare the chamber for such a guest? How shall some poor occupant of some wretched hut by the way-side, fit it up for the abode of a prince? The answer lies in these words that precede my text. You cannot strengthen the rafters and lift the roof and adorn the halls and furnish the floor in a manner befitting the coming of the King; but you can turn to that Divine Spirit who will expand and embellish and invigorate your whole spirit, and make it capable of receiving the indwelling Christ. It is Christ in the heart that makes the heart fit for Christ to dwell in the heart. You cannot do it by your own power ; turn to Him and let Him make you temples meet for Himself.

Therefore, all, Christian men and women, here is the ideal of our lives, capable of being approximated to (if not absolutely in its entirety reached) with far more perfection than it ever has been before by us, that there might be a line of light never interrupted running all through our religious experience. Instead of that there is a light point here, and a great gap of darkness there, like the straggling lamps by the wayside in the half-lighted squalid suburbs of some great city. Is that your Christian life, broken by many interruptions, and having often sounding through it the solemn words of the retreating Divinity which the old profound legend tells us were heard the night before the Temple on Zion was burnt:—" Let us depart?" "I will arise and return unto My place till they acknowledge their offences." God means and wishes that Christ may continuously dwell in our hearts. Does He to your own consciousness dwell in yours today and every day?

Saturday, May 23, 2015



Excerpts From a Discourse on Meekness
By Matthew Henry; Edited by Doktor Riktor Von Zhades

Conclusion and Closing Statement

I know no errand that I can come upon of this kind to you, in which methinks I should be more likely to prevail than in this; so much does meekness conduce to the comfort and repose of our own souls, and the making of our lives sweet and pleasant. If thou be wise herein, thou shalt be wise for thyself. That which I have been so intent upon in this discourse, is only to persuade you not to be your own tormentors, but to govern your own passions so that they may not be furies to yourselves. The ornament I have been recommending to you is confessedly excellent and lovely; will you put it on and wear it, that by this all men may know you are Christ's disciples? and you may be found among the sheep on the right hand, at the great day, when Christ's angels shall gather out of his kingdom every thing that offends. Every one will give meekness a good word; but in this, as in other instances, honesty is applauded, yet neglected.Love is commended by all, and yet the love of many waxeth cold; but let all that would not be self-condemned, practise what they praise. And as there is nothing in which I should more expect to prevail, so there is nothing in which it will easier appear whether I have prevailed or no: this tree will soon be known by its fruits; so many are the circumstances of almost every day which call for the exercise of this grace, that our profiting therein will quickly appear to ourselves, and to all with whom we converse. Our meekness and quietness is more obvious, and falls more directly under a trial and observation, than our love to God and our faith in Christ, and other graces, the exercise whereof lies more immediately between God and our own souls. Shall we therefore set ourselves to manifest, in all our converse, that we have indeed received good by this plain discourse? that our relations and neighbors, and all that we have dealings with, may observe a change in us for the better, and may take knowledge of us that we have been with Jesus. And let not the impressions of it ever wear off, but, living and dying, let us be found among the quiet in the land: we all wish to see quiet families, and quiet churches, and quiet neighborhoods, and quiet nations; and it will be so if there be quiet hearts, and not otherwise.




Word of God

Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth from the mouth of God
Matthew 4:4

The Gospel According to Luke 5:16

16 But he kept himself apart in the wilderness, and prayed.

Brethren:

Into a desert place, that he might have rest from the fatigues of preaching and healing diseases; and being alone, and free from company, might have an opportunity for private prayer to God the Father. this is to be understood of Christ, as man: as God, he is the object of prayer, and petitions are often addressed unto him; and as mediator, he offers up the prayers of all saints, and presents them to his Father; which are acceptable to him, through the incense of his mediation; and as man, he prayed himself: what he now prayed for, is not known; sometimes he prayed for his disciples, and for all that should believe; for their conversion, sanctification, union, perseverance, and glorification; and [perhaps] sometimes for himself, that the cup might pass from him, and he be saved from death; but always with submission to the will of his Father.



Friday, May 22, 2015




Word of God

Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth from the mouth of God
Matthew 4:4

The Gospel According to Luke 5:8, 10b


8 Now when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus knees, saying, Lord, go from me: for I am a sinful man.

10b Then Jesus said unto Simon, Fear not: from henceforth thou shalt catch men

Brethren:

Many times we have touched on a subject of one of Satan’s greatest lies, that being how so many people believe that they cannot come to Christ, and to the Father because they are sinners. They know not how he came for them simply because they were dead in sin. In fact this editor was convinced of this lie. So often had it been whispered into the mind, and ears by the devil, that one was most sure of his destination. And it would have been so, had not someone shone the light of the Gospel of Christ upon the darkness of this one’s mind, thereby setting one free from sind and it’s wages of death. It was then that commitment to Christ became part of this one’s life from then forward, and the encouraging and seeking of others to do the same became a goal worthy of being sought after.


Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord;

This he said, not as though the presence of Christ was burdensome, or disagreeable to him; but as one amazed at the greatness of the miracle wrought, and struck with the sense of the power of Christ, put forth therein; and with the greatness of his majesty so near him; and as conscious to himself of his own vileness and unworthiness to be in his presence; and so the Persic version adds, and which may serve as a comment, "and am not worthy that thou shouldst be with me": he had much the same sense of things as the centurion had, and when it is considered how gracious persons have been struck with awe and fear, and a consciousness of sin, weakness, and unworthiness, at the appearance of an angel, as Zacharias, and the shepherds, yea, at the presence of an holy man of God, as the widow of Sarepta at Elijah, saying much the same as Peter does here, it need not be wondered at, that Peter should so express himself, in these circumstances.

From henceforth thou shalt catch men;

Alive, as the word signifies, or "unto life", as the Syriac and Persic versions render it; thou shalt cast the net of the Gospel, and be the happy instrument of drawing many persons out of the depths of sin and misery, in which they are plunged, into the way of life and salvation; and which was greatly verified, in the conversion of three thousand at one cast, under one sermon of his.


Thursday, May 21, 2015




Word of God

Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth from the mouth of God
Matthew 4:4

The Gospel According to Luke 4:32, 43

32 And they were astonied at his doctrine: for his word was with authority.
43 But he said unto them, Surely I must also preach the kingdom of God to other cities: for therefore am I sent.

Brethren:

At the matter of it, as well as the manner in which it was delivered, it being so different from the Scribes and Pharisees, they had been used to, as he spake with great fervency, majesty, and authority, and not with coldness and indifference, and dependence on the sense and authority of others, as their teachers did; and besides, such power went along with the word, that it reached their hearts; and as the Persic version renders it, "he penetrated them with it"; and he also confirmed it by powerful operations, by miraculous works, such as casting out devils, and healing diseases of which much accounts are written.

Christ signifies, that a principal part of his work lay in preaching the things concerning the kingdom of God, the Gospel dispensation on earth, the doctrines and ordinances of it, as well as the things which relate to the kingdom of glory; as what is the saints meetness for it, their regeneration, and their right unto it, which lies in his righteousness: and that as he had preached these things at Capernaum, there was a necessity upon him to preach them in other cities of Galilee and Judea: for therefore am I sent; as he was by his heavenly Father, and had himself also undertook and engaged to do it.